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Wealth Management New Albany, Ohio

You have worked diligently toward becoming financially successful. Now what? Together we will answer that question. We will guide you through steps you can employ in order to preserve what you have worked so hard to achieve.


  • Advisory accounts
  • Asset protection planning
  • Strategic distribution planning
  • Refining your dreams and resources


"And so I have grown up wanting to feel secure when it comes to money, but doing so by treating it as something to be enjoyed, shared, and not given power." - Alan Cumming, "Not My Father's Son"




 

Get Wealth Management Services in New Albany, Ohio

Putting your entrepreneurial skills to work can be very exciting. As you become your own boss, it can be invigorating to gain flexibility and imagine potential future plans. During this time, it’s important to remember that new planning and operational challenges will arise. These can have a major impact on your income, health, and legacy.

With goal-based wealth management services in New Albany, Ohio, you can get a holistic perspective on your finances and risks. Strategies are tailored toward your short- and long-term goals while keeping focus on maximizing the benefits of business ownership.

A few things wealth management consulting can help you with:

  • Selecting your business entity type
  • Determining a retirement plan
  • Finding healthcare options
  • Managing the risks of being an independent business owner
  • Considering tax implications
  • Building a legacy and transition strategy 


You’ll be receiving a series of short educational emails that cover the decisions that could have the biggest impact on your future earnings (unless you ask to be removed). If you’d like to discuss your unique situation, give the office a call to schedule a no-cost business ownership and wealth management consultation in New Albany, Ohio.

Wealth Management: Emotional vs. Strategic Decisions


Information vs. instinct. When it comes to investing, many people believe they have a “knack” for choosing good investments. But what exactly is that “knack” based on? The fact is, the choices we make with our assets can be strongly influenced by factors, many of them emotional, that we may not even be aware of.

Investing involves risks. Remember that Investment decisions should be based on your own goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. The return and principal value of investments will fluctuate as market conditions change. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost.

Deal du jour. You’ve heard the whispers, the “next greatest thing” is out there, and you can get on board, but only if you hurry. Sound familiar? The prospect of being on the ground floor of the next big thing can be thrilling. But while there really are great new opportunities out there once in a while, those “hot new investments” can often go south quickly. Jumping on board without all the information can be a mistake. A disciplined investor may turn away from spur-of-the-moment trends and seek out solid, proven investments with consistent returns.

Risky business. Many people claim not to be risk-takers, but that isn’t always the case. Most disciplined investors aren’t reluctant to take a risk. But they will attempt to manage losses. By keeping your final goals in mind as you weigh both the potential gain and potential loss, you may be able to better assess what risks you are prepared to take.

You can’t always know what’s coming. Some investors attempt to predict the future based on the past. As we all know, just because a stock rose yesterday, that doesn’t mean it will rise again today. In fact, performance does not guarantee future results.

The gut-driven investor. Some investors tend to pull out of investments the moment they lose money, then invest again once they feel “driven” to do so. While they may do some research, they are ultimately acting on impulse. This method of investing may result in losses.

Eliminating emotion. Many investors “stir up” their investments when major events happen, including births, marriages, or deaths. They seem to get a renewed interest in their stocks and/or begin to second-guess the effectiveness of their long-term strategies. A financial professional can help you focus on your long-term objectives and may help you manage being influenced by short-term whims.

Best-Performing Asset Classes

According to Yale University's Crash Confidence Index, only about 27% of investors are confident the stock market will not crash sometime during the next six months.1

But if fear leads investors to avoid the entire investment class, they may limit their potential returns. For example, during the 20-year period ended December 31, 2018, stocks had an average annual return of 7.2%. By comparison, bonds returned 5.5% and cash 1.8% during the same timeframe. During that 20-year stretch, stocks outperformed bonds and cash in 14 years out of 20.2

But the stock market is volatile. Between October 9, 2007 and March 9, 2009, the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index shed well over half its value. But then the S&P 500 started clawing its way back and ended 2010 within 20% of the October 9, 2007, close.3

If the impulse to be safe keeps investors out of the stock market, it may also keep them from taking advantage of the potential returns the stock market has to offer.

Cash alternatives – the most conservative of the three investment classes – outperformed stocks and bonds only twice during the 20-year period.2

A sound investing strategy considers short-term volatility without losing sight of long-term objectives.

A sound strategy can involve diversifying capital between different classes of investments. That way, under-performance in one type of asset may be offset by the performance of another.

Bear in mind, though, that diversification and asset allocation are approaches to help manage investment risk. They do not eliminate the risk of loss if a security price declines. The asset class that performs best one year may not do so the next. Diversifying your holdings among several different investment types and understanding that asset classes can move in and out of favor may help you manage the risk in your investment portfolio.

Changing Lead

The asset class that performs best one year doesn’t necessarily do so the next.2

Changing Lead
  1. Yale University, 2018
  2. Thomson Reuters, 2019, for the period December 31, 1998 through December 31, 2018. Stocks are represented by the S&P 500 Composite index (total return), an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of the U.S. stock market. Bonds are represented by the Citigroup Corporate Bond Composite Index, an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of the U.S. bond market. Cash is represented by the Citigroup 3-Month Treasury-Bill index, an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of short-term cash alternatives. U.S. Treasury bills are guaranteed by the federal government as to the timely payment of principal and interest. However, if you sell a Treasury bill prior to maturity, it could be worth more or less that the original price paid. Index performance is not indicative of the past performance of a particular investment. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Individuals cannot invest directly in an index.
  3. Standard & Poor’s Corp, 2019. The high of 1565.15 was recorded on October 9, 2007 and the low of 676.53 was recorded on March 9, 2009. The S&P 500 Composite index (total return) is an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of the U.S. stock market. Index performance is not indicative of the past performance of a particular investment. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Individuals cannot invest directly in an index.


Investments in securities do not offer a fix rate of return. Principal, yield and/or share price will fluctuate with changes in market conditions and, when sold or redeemed, you may receive more or less than originally invested.  No system or financial planning strategy can guarantee future results. 

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